Archive | Young Scientists RSS feed for this section

Launching the EGU Twitter Journal Club!

12 Jun

To commemorate approaching the magical 1,000-follower mark on Twitter, the EGU is happy to launch its online journal club! This relatively new concept has proven to be very popular in other areas of science and we’re keen to see how it evolves within the rapidly growing EGU online community.

Get ready for the launch of EGU’s very own journal club!

How does it work?
Initially, we will present you with a publicly accessible journal article (likely from an EGU publication), you read it, then all of us ‘discuss’ it on Twitter at a specified time using a specific hashtag (#egutjc). The Storify transcript of the event will subsequently be published on our blog. As the club progresses, you will be asked to recommend articles for discussion based on your own interests and expertise.

How long do we get to read the article?
You will get around a week to read each article before the discussion takes place.

How long is the discussion?
The formal portion of the discussion will last one hour but, if there’s more to say, feel free to continue for longer.

Will we be provided with background information?
Yes, we will precede each discussion by tweeting any relevant links and information we can find – and we hope you will do the same. The announcement of the article will be accompanied by a short summary as well as discussion points to get you started.

Sounds great! When does it start?
Soon! The first article will be divulged on GeoLog and Twitter on Friday 15 June. The first journal club discussion will take place on Thursday 21 June at 17:00 CEST, allowing even our most distant North American friends to join in from the breakfast table.

What if I have more questions?
Please email the EGU’s Science Communications Fellow Edvard Glücksman with further questions.

Interview: Joel Gill, founding director of Geology for Global Development (GfGD)

27 Apr

Geology for Global Development (GfGD) is a new UK organisation. Its vision is to inspire students and recent graduates in the geosciences to use their knowledge of the Earth to fight poverty and improve lives. Many geoscientists work on issues such as water resources, energy supply, mining, infrastructure, natural hazards and climate change. Their knowledge of this broad range of subjects mean they can make a significant contribution to global, sustainable development. Joel Gill, the founding director of GfGD, was speaking in the geo-ethics session on Thursday afternoon at the EGU.

What prompted you to set up GfGD to begin with?

“I’ve done a little bit of work in developing countries and through that I’ve recognised the real, positive contribution that geologists can make to international development. Looking back through my training I saw a lack of technical training and the soft skills that were essential to do that work effectively. I learnt the hard way that I needed more than a geological hammer and a geological map to do the work. I needed to learn how to communicate cross-culturally, how to engage local communities in what we were doing. The organisation was established in order to give young geoscientists that opportunity to develop those skills and get the experience so that they could make a significant contribution to international development.”

Joel Gill stops by the Press Office at General Assembly 2012

What has GfGD been doing so far?

“So far we’ve established four university groups in Cambridge, Leeds, Leicester and University College London. They’ve organised a number of seminars for students to come and think about topics they wouldn’t get through their traditional university disciplines. We’ve also been involved in some advocacy, lobbying the government to promote the role of geoscience in international development. We’ve started to develop some resources that can be used by small NGOs that maybe don’t have access to a geologist. There’s also a blog for students to get involved in science communication and put across their work.”

How have you found your experience at EGU? Are people receptive to discussions on these topics?

“It’s been a real privilege to be at EGU and have the opportunity to put across the work of Geology for Global Development through one of the sessions. I’ve had a number of chats through the week with people from different backgrounds, different ages and different points in their career who have a real interest in seeing better quality geoscience within development and thinking about how we get that across. It’s also been challenging listening to some of the conversations from people working in the field and where they think the problems lie compared to where I think the problems lie. It’s been a mixed bag.”

Geology for Global Development, using knowledge of Earth to fight poverty.

Finally, what are your hopes for GfGD in the longer term?

“We want to establish ourselves as a registered charity and raise our profile through establishing more university groups. We hope to change the face of geoscience education in the UK by bringing in more examples from developing situations for lecturers to use and by starting more interdisciplinary conversations where geologists talk to social scientists and engineers. We also hope to establish placements and a bursary scheme so that young geoscientists have the opportunity to go overseas and get involved with local institutions, NGOs and government surveys who are there longer term so that they are then equipped to continue making valuable contributions throughout their careers.”

More information about GfGD is available on their website and their blog. Joel would also love to hear from anyone at a UK university who is interested in establishing a university group.

By Tim Middleton, University of Cambridge

Financial Support for EGU GA 2012

11 Nov

A limited amount of the overall budget of the EGU General Assembly 2012 is reserved to assist young scientists to attend the assembly. The financial support may include waiving of the registration fee and a refund of the Abstract Processing Charge (APC) related to the abstract for which support was requested. Additionally, the grant may include a support for travel expenditures.

The European Geosciences Union’s definition of Young Scientist is available online and is below: by 1 January of the year when the award is presented the scientist should be:

  • be in age 35* or younger.
  • be an undergraduate or postgraduate (Masters/PhD) student or have received her/his highest degree qualification (e.g., BSc, MSc, PhD) within the last seven years*.

* Where appropriate, up to one year of parental leave time may be added per child.

Please note, that the Abstract Processing Charge (APC) is also applied in case of support applications.

Each support award is granted to the contact author for a particular abstract. Should this abstract be withdrawn before the meeting or should this abstract not be presented at the meeting although the author who has been awarded is present at the meeting, the award has to be returned, i.e. the author in question will be asked to register and, if necessary, to pay back the money received. Awards cannot be transferred!

There are currently three different financial support schemes run by the European Geosciences Union.

  1. Young Scientist’s Travel Award for Europeans (YSTA): This award includes a free registration together with a refund of the Abstract Processing Charge (APC) related to the abstract for which support was requested. Depending on the decision of the Support Committee an additional financial support for the travel expenditures with a maximum of €300 could be granted as well. Only the granted amount mentioned in the financial support email will be paid out to the supported contact author personally during the EGU General Assembly 2012.
  2. Adrian Gill Travel Award (AGTA): For a young scientist from Britain to take part in a session of the Atmospheric Sciences or Ocean Sciences programme. This award includes a free registration together with a refund of the Abstract Processing Charge (APC) related to the abstract for which support was requested. Depending on the decision of the Support Committee an additional financial support for the travel expenditures with a maximum of €300 could be granted as well. Only the granted amount mentioned in the financial support email will be paid out to the supported contact author personally during the EGU General Assembly 2012.
  3. Keith Runcorn Travel Award for Non-Europeans (KRTA): This award includes a free registration together with a refund of the Abstract Processing Charge (APC) related to the abstract for which support was requested. Depending on the decision of the Support Committee an additional financial support for the travel expenditures with a maximum of €500 could be granted as well. Only the granted amount mentioned in the financial support email will be paid out to the supported contact author personally during the EGU General Assembly 2012.

Scientists, who wish to apply for financial support must be the principal author of their contribution, and they must submit an abstract by 15 December 2011. The EGU support selection committee will decide about the support of individual contribution until 28 January 2012. All applicants will be informed afterwards.

For the submission of your abstract/application for financial support, please follow the normal procedure and tick the appropriate boxes during submission. A screenshot of the first screen of the abstract submission process is shown below, the support application section is in the red box.

This information is also available on the EGU GA 2012 webpages.